Upper Manhattan

East Harlem

East Harlem/El Barrio (Spanish Harlem) stretches from First Avenue to Fifth Avenue and from East 96th Street to East 125th Street. The diverse neighborhood offers a wide range of choices for anyone looking for a new home among a choice of row houses, new condos, studios, lofts and brownstones. Space is more plentiful here, and outdoor gardens and parking—extremely rare elsewhere in Manhattan—are a frequent and pleasant surprise. New buildings offer stunning views of the East River and the two East Side uptown bridges.
The area is a find for lovers of foods from all over the world as well. From pizza to Creole and Indian, you'll probably find it here. New restaurants and shops have arrived, too, though cultural legends endure—the neighborhood still celebrates the City's first Italian feast honoring Our Lady of Mount Carmel. East Harlem is also home to Metropolis, one of the few major television studios north of Midtown as well as a number of museums and cultural centers.

The newly-opened East River Plaza on 116th Street and FDR Drive has brought megastore convenience (Target, Best Buy, Marshall's) to the area as well. A Metro-North Railroad Station at 125th Street, a 4-5-6 Lexington Avenue subway stop, and an entrance to the FDR Drive make this an access-friendly area.

Hamilton Heights

The Harlem neighborhood at the center of West 125th Street to West 155th Street, from Riverside Drive to St. Nicholas and Edgecombe Avenues is known as Hamilton Heights.It is best known for “Strivers’ Row,” consisting of some of the most beautifully restored historic townhouses in New York City, many with painstakingly renovated ornate staircases, fireplaces, pocket doors, and moldings. The stunning block of homes overlooks gardens in the back and offers the added value of subway access (with stops at 135th and 145th Streets).
These beautiful row houses are the best known, but overall this is a neighborhood with an unusually high concentration of historic single-family homes built in a variety of notable architectural styles ranging from Beaux-Arts to Romanesque.

Some more great reasons to call this neighborhood home are Riverbank State Park, the City College Campus of the City University of New York, St. Nicholas Park and access to the Hudson River as well as future plans that include state-of-the art environmental design and public art. Restaurants and nightlife in the area include many new and old favorites including a revamped version of the legendary El Morocco nightclub. Nearby, the neighborhoods of Inwood and Washington Heights are rich in culture and natural beauty with Fort Tryon and Inwood Hill Parks offering acres of unspoiled land and river views.

Harlem

Harlem and Central Harlem is located west of Fifth Avenue and the East River and stretches from 110th Street, or Central Park North, to 155th Street. Harlem has long been defined by boom-and-bust cycles and dramatic population shifts. In the 1920s and 1930s, the neighborhood was the center of the first Harlem Renaissance, a cultural high point in the history of the American black community. In the late part of the 20th century, Harlem experienced a massive building boom. Newer buildings range in size and style from studios to lofts and luxury condos. Harlem boasts many of the finest original townhouses in New York.

here are a growing number of shopping options on 125th Street, and in addition to Central Park, Marcus Garvey Park offers twenty acres of play-space, concerts and events—like the City's Charlie Parker Jazz Festival—between 120th and 124th Streets. Iconic venues like the Apollo Theater draw visitors from around the world. The New York Times recently reported that the population of "Greater Harlem" had grown more since 2000—former U.S. President Bill Clinton moved into his Harlem office in 2001—than in any decade since the 1940s. Harlem's newest population is refreshingly diverse, made up of residents who enjoy the neighborhood’s history, the gorgeous homes and unrenovated gems, oozing with potential. Subways include the 6 for East Harlem; the 2 or 3 for Central Harlem; and the A, B, C, or D for West Harlem.

Hudson Heights

previously known as Fort Tryon—is within the boundaries of a larger area known as Washington Heights. It is bounded to the north by Fort Tryon Park, to the west by the Hudson River, to the east by Broadway and to the south by West 181st Street. Manhattan's highest natural point (265 feet above sea level) is here, in Bennett Park. The neighborhood is mostly residential, with many pre-war buildings in the Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Neo-Classical, Tudor and Gothic styles. Most are co-ops, though there are condos and rentals available here as well.

n recent years Hudson Heights has become a sweet spot for buyers who don't want to leave Manhattan but want more space for their money. The area is known for its hills and the cliffs that are now Fort Tryon Park. Its best-known cultural asset is The Cloisters—located in Fort Tryon Park as well—where the Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibits its collection of medieval art among serene walkways, dramatic medieval architecture and leafy paths.
Near 181st Street is a cluster of restaurants and tiny bodegas, the usual coffee house staples as well as the four-screen Coliseum Cinema, which has the distinction of being the only movie theater above 125th Street in Manhattan. If you work in Manhattan, Hudson Heights (West 181st Street) is only five stops to Port Authority on the A line via express.

Inwood

Inwood and Washington Heights are Manhattan's two northernmost neighborhoods and a sweet spot for buyers who don't want to leave the Island but want considerably more space for their money. Inwood begins at Dyckman Street and extends to the most northern tip of Manhattan. It was a rural area well into the early 20th century, and its hills, cliffs and green spaces feel worlds away from the urban bustle of the city below. Inwood Hill Park on the Hudson River is a largely wooded city park that contains caves, the last salt marsh in Manhattan, and the last natural forest standing on Manhattan Island. Parts of Fort Tryon Park and Highbridge Park lie along Inwood's southern border. For even more outdoor options there are Isham Park, Jacob Javits Athletic Field and Columbia University's 23-acre athletic fields.

The area's best-known cultural asset is The Cloisters—located in Fort Tryon Park—where the Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibits its collection of Medieval art among serene walkways, dramatic Medieval architecture and leafy paths. Artists from Inwood and the surrounding communities participate in the annual Uptown Arts Stroll each summer.
The uptown neighborhood is filled with varied food finds, and a number of hip restaurants, cafes, bars, upscale wine and food shops and galleries. Inwood is served by the 1 and the A subway lines, with Port Authority only 5 stops away (20 minutes or less) via express.

Washington Heights

Washington Heights is the Manhattan neighborhood just north of Harlem from 155th Street to Inwood up to Dyckman Street. The area is known for its hills and the cliffs—a real change of scenery for Manhattanites. The neighborhood's best-known cultural asset is The Cloisters—located in Fort Tryon Park—where the Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibits its collection of Medieval art among serene walkways, dramatic Medieval architecture and leafy paths. You'll find plenty of parks here, including Bennett Park, Fort Tyron Park, Fort Washington Park and Riverfront Park. Artists from Washington Heights and the surrounding communities participate in the annual Uptown Arts Stroll each summer, and there are several branches of the New York Public Library.

Within Washington Heights is the community known as Hudson Heights, a residential neighborhood made up of mostly pre-war buildings in the Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Neo-Classical, Tudor and Gothic styles that has become a sweet spot for buyers who want considerably more space for their money. The New Balance Track and Field Center in the Fort Washington Avenue Armory maintains an Olympic-grade track, and mountain bike races take place in Highbridge Park in the spring and summer. Washington Heights is a vibrant, neighborly community with plenty of food finds, and a number of upscale wine and food shops and businesses. Washington Heights is connected to New Jersey via the George Washington Bridge and the neighborhood is served by the C and the A subways, with Port Authority only 5 stops away via express.